Want to Solve Crime? Time for Terror

By |2019-09-19T08:36:39+00:00September 19th, 2019|Comment|

The following is an excerpt of an article by Darcy Clements. This features in our fifth print issue, available now.

Find out how to get your own copy of the issue here.

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Do we, at last, have a Prime Minister and Home Secretary willing to put the peace and freedom of the citizens whom they serve above the interests of liberal lobbyists, preachers of identity politics and the liberty-hating Left?

There is little doubt that in the month following the election of Boris Johnson as leader of the Conservative Party there has been a clear, recognisable shift in the functioning of government, mostly in terms of style, but also in substance.

The changes in policy are far more interesting, such as a commitment to leave the EU by 31st October, 20,000 new police officers, a review of many transport related decisions (HS2, Heathrow expansion) and a crackdown on crime and disorder. For the first time in several years, there is now a government that is proposing policies of the kind that I would gladly welcome with open arms.

I am fully aware, however, that most of these will not come to fruition, as political promises rarely do, especially when espoused by career opportunists such as Boris Johnson.

For at least the last forty years, successive governments, both Labour and Tory, have systematically weakened and misdirected one of the last of our surviving great institutions: the police. Created in the 1820s by Robert Peel with the purpose of patrolling the streets to prevent and dissuade criminal activity, the police were, for over a century, successful in reducing and limiting crime on our streets.

The new Home Secretary Priti Patel has committed the government to which she belongs to a zero tolerance on crime, claiming she wants criminals to ‘literally feel terror at the thought of committing offences’. But will she stick to her guns and return her party to genuine law enforcement?

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Read the rest of this article in the print issue, information on which can be found HERE.

Photo by André Gustavo Stumpf on Flickr.

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